Injection Moulding Specialists

How  Injection Moulded parts are made.

GIF
1.

The mould closes and is held closed with a force of up to several hundred tonnes,
depending on the size of moulding machine. This high pressure is to counteract the hydraulic pressure attempting to force the mould open when the molten plastic is injected into the mould. The larger the moulded part, the more tonnes (and larger machine) are required to hold the mould closed.

2.

Molten plastic is then injected into the mould tool. Injection pressures can be as high as 20,000psi, approx 9 tonnes per square inch.

3.

The part is now left to cool and during this time, the screw rotates and forces molten
material to the front of the screw ready for the next injection cycle.

4.

When the part has cooled and solidified sufficiently, the mould opens and the part is
ejected from the mould. Then the cycle begins again..

  1. The mould closes and is held closed with a force of up to several hundred tonnes, depending on the size of moulding machine. This high pressure is to counteract the hydraulic pressure attempting to force the mould open, when the molten plastic is injected into the mould. The larger the moulded part, the more tonnes (and larger machine) are required to hold the mould closed.
  2. Molten plastic is then injected into the mould tool. Injection pressures can be as high as 20,000psi, approx 9 tonnes per square inch.
  3. The part is now left to cool and during this time, the screw rotates and forces molten
    material to the front of the screw ready for the next injection cycle.
  4. When the part has cooled and solidified sufficiently, the mould opens and the part is
    ejected from the mould. Then the cycle begins again.

For more information on Plastic Injection Moulding, see our Layman's Guide >

Click here to see video of a real machines in production.

Contact us...

Dickinson Philips Ltd, Snaygill Industrial Estate, Skipton, North Yorkshire BD23 2QR

Tel: 01756 700 359 Fax: 01756 700 360

[email protected]